Category Archive: Vitamins

5 Naturally Occurring Salt Sources For When the SHTF

Salt is a life-saving, multifunctional preparedness item that all households should have stored for long term emergencies. This essential prep contains natural medicinal sources and also serves other tasks as well, including being used as a natural electrolyte, meat curing, assists in tanning hides, and can even be added to boost soap recipes.

Our Survival Depends on Sodium

Our bodies are dependent on small amounts of sodium to perform biological tasks. Specifically, sodium helps muscles and nerves work properly by assisting muscular contraction and transmission of nerve signals. It also helps regulate blood pressure and volume. MayoClinic.com reports having the proper amount of sodium in the body maintains an appropriate overall balance of bodily fluids. Sodium also helps sustain a regular blood pH level, an important indicator of health.

As previously mentioned, salt in small amounts is good for the body. The amount of sodium you should consume daily varies, however, based on a number of health factors.

Table salt is the most common dietary source and contains 40 percent sodium.

On average, one teaspoon of table salt contains 2,300 milligrams of sodium, which is the recommended maximum intake of sodium per healthy adult per day, according to government nutrition experts.

However, there are ways to get your sodium from means other than table salt. From a preparedness standpoint, salt can be found naturally in many different substances.

5 Naturally Occurring Salt Sources

1. Sea Water – Louis and Clark spent many days boiling down salt water to get salt. Salt water on average carries about 35 grams of salt. 2 tablespoons of seawater is your recommended daily salt intake. You want to mix this with at least 1/3rd with fresh water before intake (or your body cannot absorb it properly due to the sodium concentration). Or, you can do what Louis Clark did and make your own sea salt.

2. Blood. Ok, I’m not telling you to go vampire, but there are traces of salt in fresh blood. Those of you who are butchering your own meat can make blood sausage, a European specialty.

3. Fresh foods. That’s right, folks, some fresh foods that are nutrient dense also possess naturally occurring amounts of sodium. Although the vast majority of fruits and vegetables, in their natural state, do not contain high levels of sodium; there are a few exceptions. Some variety of beans are good sources of sodium. For example, 100 g of mung beans contain about 820 mg of sodium, whereas 60 g of garbanzo beans contains 850 mg of sodium.

Green leafy vegetables and roots naturally contain trace amounts of salt, as well. Some of the top contenders include Swiss chard, which contains about 158 mg per 1/2 cup; beet, collard, dandelion, mustard and turnip greens contain about 174 mg of sodium per 1/2 cup; artichoke hearts contain about 80 mg per 1/2 cup, while spinach contains about 80 mg per 1/2 cup. Some other vegetables moderate amounts of sodium are peanuts, lemons, celery.

Further, vegetables and roots that grow in salty ocean water, such as seaweed and sea kelp have natural salts, as well as, omega 3 and essential amino acids and other nutritional benefits.

4. Edible roots. Some roots, such as the root from the hickory three contain higher amounts of sodium. Parsley root is an exceptional root with moderate amounts of sodium. Further, red and gold beets contain around 65 mg of sodium per beet, and make a viable salt substitute. Similar to celery, potatoes have trace amounts of sodium as do carrots which possess 50 mg of sodium.

5. Mineral deposits  – Many preppers have discussed purchasing salt licks typically used for livestock to use for long term emergencies. Although they are cheap and contain 50 lbs. of compressed salt, there is some concern with this however, due to the binders in the salt lick. Further, salt licks contains additives such as selenium, magnesium, iodine and other mineral amounts that may not be safe for humans. In this case, it may be better to purchase salt licks to lure deer and other wild animals for hunting purposes. Although this is typically forbidden in many states, in long term disasters, I imagine that those laws will be null and void.

Naturally occurring salt deposits are often found near springs and streams. However, in many areas there are natural salt caverns.


This could give a greater advantage to accessing salt for long term survival – if you are lucky enough to live near these areas. Salt Lake City, UT has a great advantage to accessing salt thanks to the naturally salt water lake present.

To Conclude

Salt in an important preparedness item to store for long term disasters. Along with its importance from a biological standpoint, it will also serve multiple functions in a SHTF environment. Knowing where to find naturally occurring sodium, sodium-rich foods or how to harvest it from sea water will give you a greater advantage for survival.

 

Start now to make sure you are staying prepared.

 

Via: readynutrition


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Things You Must Eat To Avoid Malnutrition

While those of us living comfortably in the United States do not see malnutrition on a regular basis, it can and will pose a problem if an unprepared population finds itself dealing with a long-term disaster.

During the turbulent times of the Great Depression, malnutrition was at the forefront of health issues and as a result, many suffered short and long-term effects of this health problem. Equipping yourself with the knowledge of why we should store certain types of food, knowing the health benefits these foods possess, how they affect our bodies, and how our bodies respond when these types of foods become scarce will help you make better choices when investing in your food storage.

Vitamin deficiency, stunted growth, skin infections, hair loss, increased illness and even death are all contributing factors to being malnourished. Malnutrition can also occur from improper water treatment. Globally, untreated water is one of the leading causes of malnutrition and one of the four most likely ways you can die in a SHTF scenario. As a result, an individual who is malnourished can have severe, or prolonged diarrhea, renal failure, infection, or diseases that cause the malabsorption of nutrients in the small intestine. Children, particularly infants and those under five years of age are also at an increased risk for malnutrition due to a greater need for energy and nutrients during periods of rapid growth and development.  Elderly adults are also prone to malnutrition as a result of a decrease in both the appetite and intestinal function. Therefore, preventative measure should be put in place for these vulnerable age groups to ward off this health issue.

4 Food Types to Avoid Malnutrition

Concentrating on storing foods that have carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals can assist in maintaining healthy bodies and decrease the likelihood of malnutrition in a long-term emergency. To find out how much food your family needs for a long-term emergency, click here. Those that are preparedness-minded may want to take a more in-depth look at the question of why it is important to store these types of food.

Carbohydrates – Simply put, carbohydrates provide the body with energy. They also have a symbiotic relationship with proteins by protecting the protein stores in the body. The brain optimally uses carbohydrates for energy, but when there is insufficient carbohydrate consumption for several weeks, the body does not metabolize fatty acids completely and as result body protein will also be lost, and the body will generally become weakened.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, half your daily calories should come from carbohydrates, so you can determine how many grams of carbohydrates you need based on your calorie intake. At a minimum, an intake of 50 to 100 grams (1.8 to 3.5 oz.) of carbohydrates is required to prevent the development of ketones that the brain can use somewhat inefficiently for energy

Preps to buy: white rice, pasta, wheat, oats, dehydrated fruits and vegetables, sugars, honey, fruits, roots and tubers (cook these well) and cereals. For those with wheat allergies, click here.

Protein – Protein is a part of every cell in the human body. Also, equally as important, proteins provide the body with a special form of nitrogen that the body cannot get from carbohydrates or lipids. Proteins also help regulate the pH, or acid-base balance, in the blood, are necessary for the synthesis of many hormones and enzymes, and participate in important cell formation for cells vital for the immune system. In the case of starvation, excessive muscle tissue is wasted and results in diminished health.

Protein, like carbohydrates, provides approximately 4 kilocalories per gram of protein consumed, but requires much more metabolizing and processing by the liver and kidneys to put the energy from protein to use.  In general, it’s recommended that 10–35% of your daily calories come from protein.

Preps to buy: legumes, eggs, nuts, peanut butter, canned meats and fish, oatmeal, grains, wheat, quinoa, MREs, popcorn

Fats  – As much as we would like to eliminate fats from our regular diets, this food source actually plays a vital role in maintaining healthy skin and hair, insulating body organs against shock, maintaining body temperature, and promoting healthy cell function. They also serve as energy stores for the body. In addition, Vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble, meaning they can only be digested, absorbed, and transported in conjunction with fats. Fats are also sources of essential fatty acids, an important dietary requirement and also serves as a useful buffer towards a host of diseases. (Source) The USDA suggests that about 30-35% of your daily calorie intake should come from fat.

Preps to buy: whole milk, ensure, peanut butter, oil (preferably plant based oils), nuts and seeds

Vitamins and Minerals – Did you know that a staggering thirteen vitamins are considered necessary to perform crucial functions in the body? Vitamins and minerals are needed for overall health and provide protection against infection and diseases, help the body grow, help the body’s metabolism and assist in the removal of waste products. It is recommended to obtain your vitamin intake through fresh fruits and vegetables with a regular diet. However, when dietary sources are limited, taking vitamin supplements is an excellent alternative. Amounts vary for children, seniors, lactating or pregnant women, smokers, heavy alcohol drinkers, stressed, those with chronic diseases or those who consume less than 2,000 calories per day.

Because vitamin deficiencies tend to exacerbate over time, we are typically unaware of being deficient until secondary issues manifest themselves. Eating a balanced diet and taking a multi vitamin is one way to curb this issue and the physiological consequences that go with it. Some physiological consequences of deficiency include: dental problems, inflammation of the mouth and tongue (riboflavin deficiency); diarrhea, dermatitis (niacin deficiency); edema, weakness (thiamin deficiency); tongue soreness, anemia (biotin deficiency); fatigue, tingling in hands (pantothenic acid deficiency); poor growth, inflammation of the tongue (folate deficiency); poor nerve function, macrocytic anemia (vitamin B12 deficiency); and poor wound healing, bleeding gums (vitamin C deficiency).

Preps to Buy: Multi vitamins, Vitamin C, Vitamin D, vitamin powders, dehydrated fruits and vegetables, seeds to grow vegetables and for sprouting, survival bars

In summation, as our standard of living continues to diminish, malnutrition will be a more present health problem within our population. Investing in healthy and nutritious foods and learning how to properly store it for long-term use can assist you in maintaining your health and prevent the short and long-term effects of malnourishment discussed in this article.

Via: readynutrition

 


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Vitamins, Minerals, and Survival

This article has been generously contributed by Simple Survival for your reading pleasure.

© 2004 Gary L. Benton

A few years ago, when I had first entered the military, I had the chance to read a copy of a survival journal written by a man that was discovered dead. The rescue team had brought out all of his gear, and then turned the journal over to the Air Force. The Air Force had copied the journal and distributed it to various sections to assist in survival training. There were many lessons to be learned from the dead man’s situation. The key to his death, or seemed to me anyway, was nutrition.

Most of us know little about nutrition, because many of are not very interested in the subject to start with. Generally, we have nutritious meals (or at least they are available), we take multi-vitamins, and we (as a country) may be a bit over weight. But, what do we, as hunters, fishermen, campers, and backpackers, know about survival nutrition? I suggest we know (and may not even care) much about the subject.

The man with the journal had died in World War II, and was not discovered until sometime in the 1950’s. His journal was not printed and distributed until the early 1970’s. While less was known about nutrition during the writer’s lifetime, there were things known that could have saved his life. However, I think, like most of us, he was neither interested nor very knowledgeable of the subject. In other words, he was typical of many outdoorsmen and women.

The dead man’s aircraft had crash-landed on a frozen lake up north (Alaska perhaps). I can’t remember exactly where he went down, and it is not very important where it happened, because his situation could be relived in many states or countries. The thing to keep in mind, his crash site was remote.

As I read his journal, I discovered a man with the guts and determination needed to survive. He was an experienced outdoorsman, with years of hunting behind him. He had also been trained, to a small extent, by the military. His journal showed a man of discipline, as well as a deep “will to survive.” Then, you are most likely asking, why did he die?

His journal indicated that while there was no big game in the woods around the lake, it was heavily populated by rabbits. He wrote of eating rabbits regularly, and then as time passed, describing how he was losing weight. Eventually his writing stopped completely. His last entry, if I remember correctly, was of his confusion of starving to death as he ate rabbit after rabbit. I remember one old grizzled survival instructor who commented about the victim, “He starved to death on a full stomach.”

The instructor went on to say that the man might have survived, he had the guts, if he had only known more about nutrition, “A rabbit is a lean critter. Not much fat on ’em and a man in a survival situation needs fat and oils. See, that man was only eating the lean flesh of the animal. He discarded the other parts that may have kept him alive. If he had eaten the contents of the rabbit’s stomach, which contains essentially green leafy grasses, (vitamins B, C, E), the rabbits eyes (which contain salt), along with the liver, heart, and kidneys (which contain vitamin A), as well as other vitamins, he might have made it. I suspect he just plain didn’t know about it. Or, he didn’t like the idea of eating a critter’s innards. Keep in mind, in a prolong survival situation protein along won’t keep you alive”

Over the years I have done a lot of thinking about what the man had written, reliving his fear of death, as well as what the sergeant had said. I have done a little research on nutrition and while I cannot even remotely claim to be an expert, I have found some basic facts we should all keep in mind about vitamins.

First, I suggest all of us carry a small container of good quality multivitamins in our survival kits. They are light and easy to carry. Keep them in the original bottle, because it protects them from sunlight, which can decrease their effectiveness, and it keeps them dry. But, what are the basic essential vitamins for us if we are in a survival situation and do not have vitamins along. Many professionals and “armchair” survival “experts” may disagree, but this is a group of vitamins I think we should be concerned about.

  • Vitamin A, (retinol). We get this vitamin from milk products, animal fat, carrots, and leafy green vegetables. Why do we need this vitamin? It helps keep your vision working well, your immune system up and working, and assists in the functioning of most major organs. Where do you find it? From animal fats, contents of the stomach of plant eating animals, wild green plants in the field.
  • Vitamin B complex, (B1, B2, B3, B5, and B12). All meats, green plants (vegetables), dairy products, gains and cereals (you can get them elsewhere as well, but they are not a source readily available to most survivors, i.e., brewers yeast). Why do we need this vitamin? They are needed for the nervous system, maintaining healthy skin, the cell production process, digestive process, respiration, bone marrow production, and to assist our metabolism. Where do you find it? Once again, by eating green leafy plants (try dandelions or banana leaf), the flesh of wild animals (including the stomach contents if the environment does not allow you to forage for fresh green veggies), pine nuts, walnuts, and perhaps even wild grains or rice.
  • Vitamin C, is found in fresh fruits, vegetables. Remember that citrus fruits and tomatoes have high levels of vitamin C. Why do we need this vitamin? It helps to build healthy tissues, tendons, and assists in absorbing iron. It is essential for healthy teeth and gums as well as for healing wounds or fractures (which may be experienced by survivors). Where do you find it? If you are lucky enough to attempt survival in a jungle, then citrus fruits may not be much of a problem. One source I use in mountains or in general locations is pine needles. The needles on pine boughs can be brewed to make a rough tasting tea. While not that tasty, it does the job of providing vitamin C as well as keeping the drinker warm.
  • Vitamin D, can be found in eggs, dairy products, and fish with fatty flesh (tuna, salmon, sardines, oysters, and others). Why do we need this vitamin? It assists in the building of bones and cartilage. Also, it is used to regulate the absorption of phosphorus and calcium in the body. Where do you find it? During your searches for food look for bird nests. While the eggs you find will not belong to a chicken, they will serve the same purpose as far as vitamin D is concerned. As far as I know, all eggs are eatable and should be eaten if available. Additionally, set fish traps, make a dip net for smaller fish and try your hand at fishing. There may not be much of a problem procuring salmon if you are along streams and rives they run on. Thousands of salmon move on our nations waterways each year. If you catch too many of them, make a drying rack and save them for future needs.
  • Vitamin E, is in rice and green leafy vegetables. Why do we need this vitamin? This is one of the least understood vitamins, but it is known to assist in the prevention of muscular dystrophy. So, it seems this vitamin may be associated with muscular functioning. Where do you find it? Look for wild rice. Surprisingly, it is out there. Remember, rice grows in wet locations so check long the banks of small ponds or lakes. You may get lucky and find a source. Keep in mind to constantly search for sources of food and vitamins around your survival site.
  • Vitamin K, is produced by our intestinal tract. It can also be found in egg yolks, leafy green plants, fish liver oils, and other sources. Why do we need this vitamin? It assists in the clotting of blood. The last problem a survivor needs is the inability to clot a bleeding injury. Where do you find it? Look for eggs as we suggested earlier, search for various green leafy plants, and it need be, build up the courage to eat the contents of an animal’s stomach. The contents of the stomach can be added to soups without affecting most people very much, especially if you don’t tell them or they don’t ask.

Other Considerations are carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and minerals.

  • Carbohydrates are found in a variety of food sources. They are found in sugars, honey, fruits, roots and tubers (cook these well) as well as in cereals. Why do we need them? They are excellent sources of energy and help prevent the nausea often caused by the breakdown of body fats in the body. Where do you find it? Look for bees (honey), wild apples, cattail roots, or even wild potatoes. Cattails will most likely be the easiest to find.
  • Fats are an excellent source of energy and are found in most animal and fish. Additionally, some plants may contain fats, as well as eggs and nuts. While some “survival experts” suggest fats can be found in fungi (mushrooms) I do not recommend eating them. They are not easy to identify by most people and overall, have very little nutrition. They have the disadvantage possibly of being poison if the survivor is unsure of its identity. Why do we need them? Fats give us our energy in a concentrated form. A key consideration here is the availability of water. Fats take water to digest, so make sure you have sufficient water when you ingest fats. Where do you find them? Animal fats are the easiest way. Keep in mind, wild game has less fat than farm animals. Also, during the winter months or early spring, wild animals may contain less fat. In the fall, after eating well all summer, wild game is usually the fatter.
  • Proteins are found in meat, eggs, fish, nuts, and grains. While also found in dairy products, you are unlikely to find a cow in a survival situation. Why do we need them? They supply amino acids, which are necessary for good health. Where do you find them? Attempt to locate wild eggs, fish often, gather nuts and grains if possible, and eat wild meat.
  • Minerals, minerals are need for good overall health. Some, not all, of the minerals we need are sodium, calcium, potassium, phosphorus, chlorine, magnesium, and sulfur. Why do we need them? They all play a role in maintaining good overall health. Where do you find them? Salt water may be boiled to produce sodium, or the eyes of the animals you kill will contain salt. Other minerals will be in the foods you eat and it should not be a problem as long as you eat a variety of foods.

While all of this information may seem overwhelming to you, you are most likely getting most of these vitamins and other things during the course of a day. We are just not aware of what is in most of our meals. Those of us who take a good quality multi-vitamin daily are getting our requirements of both vitamins and minerals.

When in the field, and forced to procure food, make sure any plants you harvest are known by you to be safe to eat. You may find almost any of the vegetables and fruits in the wild that are for purchase at your local market. Remember to wash them, but do not soak them in water (prolong soaking can reduce the vitamin content). I suggest boiling them in soups or stews to retain most of the vitamins that would otherwise be lost. While the ideas of eating some of the foods survivors are at times forced to eat may be repulsive to some, what is the option?

It has been less than 100 years since the link between foods and diseases has been identified to some degree. British biochemist Fredrick Hopkins, in 1906, proved in his studies the association between vitamins (though not called that yet) and the human body. He found a “missing link”. His research indicated that a body not only needed proteins, carbohydrates, minerals, water, and fats to develop, but it also needed what he called “accessory factors.” Further research by others has shown these “accessory factors” were in fact what we today call vitamins.

Primitive man had no knowledge of vitamins, but his instincts were fairly good. Often, after the killing of a buffalo or large game, he would eat parts of the liver or other internal organs raw, almost immediately. I have read of explorers who did the same and they described a deep “animal like craving” for the bloody meal. Additionally, Native American ate most parts of the game they killed. Were they merely being thrifty with the game they killed or did the act serve some other unknown urge? I think this urge to eat most of killed game was a body’s need for life saving essential vitamins and minerals.

If you are ever faced with a true life and death survival situation, remember this article. Keep in mind to constantly be looking for a variety of foods, thus a variety of vitamins and minerals. Eat plenty of green leafy plants (if you can safely identify the plant), gather eggs, nuts, pine needles and other sources of food. Set out fish traps. Consider eating the parts of an animal you would not usually consider a “prime cut.” Survival is not for the weak of heart. Those who do what ever is needed still have no assurance of survival. Nonetheless, the will to survive, continuous hard work, and constantly procuring sources of food can increase your chances of survival. Take care and I hope to see you in the field.

Via: readynutrition

 


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Vitamins, Minerals, and Survival

This article was by Simple Survival.

© 2004 Gary L. Benton

A few years ago, when I had first entered the military, I had the chance to read a copy of a survival journal written by a man that was discovered dead. The rescue team had brought out all of his gear, and then turned the journal over to the Air Force. The Air Force had copied the journal and distributed it to various sections to assist in survival training. There were many lessons to be learned from the dead man’s situation. The key to his death, or seemed to me anyway, was nutrition.

Most of us know little about nutrition, because many of are not very interested in the subject to start with. Generally, we have nutritious meals (or at least they are available), we take multi-vitamins, and we (as a country) may be a bit over weight. But, what do we, as hunters, fishermen, campers, and backpackers, know about survival nutrition? I suggest we know (and may not even care) much about the subject.

The man with the journal had died in World War II, and was not discovered until sometime in the 1950’s. His journal was not printed and distributed until the early 1970’s. While less was known about nutrition during the writer’s lifetime, there were things known that could have saved his life. However, I think, like most of us, he was neither interested nor very knowledgeable of the subject. In other words, he was typical of many outdoorsmen and women.

The dead man’s aircraft had crash-landed on a frozen lake up north (Alaska perhaps). I can’t remember exactly where he went down, and it is not very important where it happened, because his situation could be relived in many states or countries. The thing to keep in mind, his crash site was remote.

As I read his journal, I discovered a man with the guts and determination needed to survive. He was an experienced outdoorsman, with years of hunting behind him. He had also been trained, to a small extent, by the military. His journal showed a man of discipline, as well as a deep “will to survive.” Then, you are most likely asking, why did he die?

His journal indicated that while there was no big game in the woods around the lake, it was heavily populated by rabbits. He wrote of eating rabbits regularly, and then as time passed, describing how he was losing weight. Eventually his writing stopped completely. His last entry, if I remember correctly, was of his confusion of starving to death as he ate rabbit after rabbit. I remember one old grizzled survival instructor who commented about the victim, “He starved to death on a full stomach.”

The instructor went on to say that the man might have survived, he had the guts, if he had only known more about nutrition, “A rabbit is a lean critter. Not much fat on ’em and a man in a survival situation needs fat and oils. See, that man was only eating the lean flesh of the animal. He discarded the other parts that may have kept him alive. If he had eaten the contents of the rabbit’s stomach, which contains essentially green leafy grasses, (vitamins B, C, E), the rabbits eyes (which contain salt), along with the liver, heart, and kidneys (which contain vitamin A), as well as other vitamins, he might have made it. I suspect he just plain didn’t know about it. Or, he didn’t like the idea of eating a critter’s innards. Keep in mind, in a prolong survival situation protein along won’t keep you alive”

Over the years I have done a lot of thinking about what the man had written, reliving his fear of death, as well as what the sergeant had said. I have done a little research on nutrition and while I cannot even remotely claim to be an expert, I have found some basic facts we should all keep in mind about vitamins.

First, I suggest all of us carry a small container of good quality multivitamins in our survival kits. They are light and easy to carry. Keep them in the original bottle, because it protects them from sunlight, which can decrease their effectiveness, and it keeps them dry. But, what are the basic essential vitamins for us if we are in a survival situation and do not have vitamins along. Many professionals and “armchair” survival “experts” may disagree, but this is a group of vitamins I think we should be concerned about.

  • Vitamin A, (retinol). We get this vitamin from milk products, animal fat, carrots, and leafy green vegetables. Why do we need this vitamin? It helps keep your vision working well, your immune system up and working, and assists in the functioning of most major organs. Where do you find it? From animal fats, contents of the stomach of plant eating animals, wild green plants in the field.
  • Vitamin B complex, (B1, B2, B3, B5, and B12). All meats, green plants (vegetables), dairy products, gains and cereals (you can get them elsewhere as well, but they are not a source readily available to most survivors, i.e., brewers yeast). Why do we need this vitamin? They are needed for the nervous system, maintaining healthy skin, the cell production process, digestive process, respiration, bone marrow production, and to assist our metabolism. Where do you find it? Once again, by eating green leafy plants (try dandelions or banana leaf), the flesh of wild animals (including the stomach contents if the environment does not allow you to forage for fresh green veggies), pine nuts, walnuts, and perhaps even wild grains or rice.
  • Vitamin C, is found in fresh fruits, vegetables. Remember that citrus fruits and tomatoes have high levels of vitamin C. Why do we need this vitamin? It helps to build healthy tissues, tendons, and assists in absorbing iron. It is essential for healthy teeth and gums as well as for healing wounds or fractures (which may be experienced by survivors). Where do you find it? If you are lucky enough to attempt survival in a jungle, then citrus fruits may not be much of a problem. One source I use in mountains or in general locations is pine needles. The needles on pine boughs can be brewed to make a rough tasting tea. While not that tasty, it does the job of providing vitamin C as well as keeping the drinker warm.
  • Vitamin D, can be found in eggs, dairy products, and fish with fatty flesh (tuna, salmon, sardines, oysters, and others). Why do we need this vitamin? It assists in the building of bones and cartilage. Also, it is used to regulate the absorption of phosphorus and calcium in the body. Where do you find it? During your searches for food look for bird nests. While the eggs you find will not belong to a chicken, they will serve the same purpose as far as vitamin D is concerned. As far as I know, all eggs are eatable and should be eaten if available. Additionally, set fish traps, make a dip net for smaller fish and try your hand at fishing. There may not be much of a problem procuring salmon if you are along streams and rives they run on. Thousands of salmon move on our nations waterways each year. If you catch too many of them, make a drying rack and save them for future needs.
  • Vitamin E, is in rice and green leafy vegetables. Why do we need this vitamin? This is one of the least understood vitamins, but it is known to assist in the prevention of muscular dystrophy. So, it seems this vitamin may be associated with muscular functioning. Where do you find it? Look for wild rice. Surprisingly, it is out there. Remember, rice grows in wet locations so check long the banks of small ponds or lakes. You may get lucky and find a source. Keep in mind to constantly search for sources of food and vitamins around your survival site.
  • Vitamin K, is produced by our intestinal tract. It can also be found in egg yolks, leafy green plants, fish liver oils, and other sources. Why do we need this vitamin? It assists in the clotting of blood. The last problem a survivor needs is the inability to clot a bleeding injury. Where do you find it? Look for eggs as we suggested earlier, search for various green leafy plants, and it need be, build up the courage to eat the contents of an animal’s stomach. The contents of the stomach can be added to soups without affecting most people very much, especially if you don’t tell them or they don’t ask.

Other Considerations are carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and minerals.

  • Carbohydrates are found in a variety of food sources. They are found in sugars, honey, fruits, roots and tubers (cook these well) as well as in cereals. Why do we need them? They are excellent sources of energy and help prevent the nausea often caused by the breakdown of body fats in the body. Where do you find it? Look for bees (honey), wild apples, cattail roots, or even wild potatoes. Cattails will most likely be the easiest to find.
  • Fats are an excellent source of energy and are found in most animal and fish. Additionally, some plants may contain fats, as well as eggs and nuts. While some “survival experts” suggest fats can be found in fungi (mushrooms) I do not recommend eating them. They are not easy to identify by most people and overall, have very little nutrition. They have the disadvantage possibly of being poison if the survivor is unsure of its identity. Why do we need them? Fats give us our energy in a concentrated form. A key consideration here is the availability of water. Fats take water to digest, so make sure you have sufficient water when you ingest fats. Where do you find them? Animal fats are the easiest way. Keep in mind, wild game has less fat than farm animals. Also, during the winter months or early spring, wild animals may contain less fat. In the fall, after eating well all summer, wild game is usually the fatter.
  • Proteins are found in meat, eggs, fish, nuts, and grains. While also found in dairy products, you are unlikely to find a cow in a survival situation. Why do we need them? They supply amino acids, which are necessary for good health. Where do you find them? Attempt to locate wild eggs, fish often, gather nuts and grains if possible, and eat wild meat.
  • Minerals, minerals are need for good overall health. Some, not all, of the minerals we need are sodium, calcium, potassium, phosphorus, chlorine, magnesium, and sulfur. Why do we need them? They all play a role in maintaining good overall health. Where do you find them? Salt water may be boilded to produce sodium, or the eyes of the animals you kill will contain salt. Other minerals will be in the foods you eat and it should not be a problem as long as you eat a variety of foods.

While all of this information may seem overwhelming to you, you are most likely getting most of these vitamins and other things during the course of a day. We are just not aware of what is in most of our meals. Those of us who take a good quality multi-vitamin daily are getting our requirements of both vitamins and minerals.

When in the field, and forced to procure food, make sure any plants you harvest are known by you to be safe to eat. You may find almost any of the vegetables and fruits in the wild that are for purchase at your local market. Remember to wash them, but do not soak them in water (prolong soaking can reduce the vitamin content). I suggest boiling them in soups or stews to retain most of the vitamins that would otherwise be lost. While the idea of eating some of the foods survivors are at times forced to eat may be repulsive to some, what is the option?

It has been less than 100 years since the link between foods and diseases has been identified to some degree. British biochemist Fredrick Hopkins, in 1906, proved in his studies the association between vitamins (though not called that yet) and the human body. He found a “missing link”. His research indicated that a body not only needed proteins, carbohydrates, minerals, water, and fats to develop, but it also needed what he called “accessory factors.” Further research by others has shown these “accessory factors” were in fact what we today call vitamins.

Primitive man had no knowledge of vitamins, but his instincts were fairly good. Often, after the killing of a buffalo or large game, he would eat parts of the liver or other internal organs raw, almost immediately. I have read of explorers who did the same and they described a deep “animal like craving” for the bloody meal. Additionally, Native American ate most parts of the game they killed. Were they merely being thrifty with the game they killed or did the act serve some other unknown urge? I think this urge to eat most of killed game was a body’s need for life saving essential vitamins and minerals.

If you are ever faced with a true life and death survival situation, remember this article. Keep in mind to constantly be looking for a variety of foods, thus a variety of vitamins and minerals. Eat plenty of green leafy plants (if you can safely identify the plant), gather eggs, nuts, pine needles and other sources of food. Set out fish traps. Consider eating the parts of an animal you would not usually consider a “prime cut.” Survival is not for the weak of heart. Those who do what ever is needed still have no assurance of survival. Nonetheless, the will to survive, continuous hard work, and constantly procuring sources of food can increase your chances of survival. Take care and I hope to see you in the field.

This article was by Simple Survival.

 


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Vitamin Infused Powders – Essential Emergency Preps

It has been said that taking vitamins are not to keep death at bay, but to keep us from deteriorating.  What happens if you become vitamin deficient? A few of the symptoms may include, (but are not limited to) chronic fatigue, anemia, lowered immune, scurvy, susceptibility to immune deficient diseases such as MRSA, hypertension, joint pain, and chronic inflammation to name a few (Source).   These symptoms are no way to survive an emergency, especially if it is for the long haul.

Regular intakes of essential vitamins such as vitamin A, B, C, D, (and the rest of the vitamin alphabet) are required to maintain physical health, mental clarity and diffuse stress.  If a long term emergency occurs, many individuals may find these vitamins hard to come by.  Storing vitamins is always an option, but their potency may diminish due to natural elements such as humidity and sunlight.  Alternatives such as vitamin supplement drinks are a great way to get the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants to help maintain metabolic function, and to boost energy levels.


Benefits of Storing Vitamin Powders

  • Each packet delivers essential vitamins and minerals that benefit the immune system, increase energy levels, promote healthy nervous system functions, and promote healthy neurotransmitter health.
  • In fact, vitamin powders such as Emergen-C provide 1,000 mg of vitamin C, 7 of the B vitamins to increase energy naturally, electrolytes to refuel the body, and offers an array of flavors.
  • Individual packets are sealed for long term use.
  • Packets can easily be stored for 72 hour kitsand vehicle 72 hour kits.
  • Packets provide a refreshing taste to treated water (Typically water that has been treated with iodine, bleach or chlorine has an unattractive taste.  When a flavored drink mix is added to the treated water, the chemical taste is not as apparent).

Emergen-C vitamin packets can be given to children as well.  For children 2-3, mix half the packet of vitamin mix to a 4 ounce glass of water.  For children 4 and up, mix 1 packet of vitamin mix to 4 ounces of water a day.   Go to the website for more information.  For more information and facts about the vitamin drink mix, click here.

Click here for a free sample of Emergen-C

I use this myself when I become sick or feel I am starting to get that way. Good way to up your vitamin C and others.

Via: readynutrition

 


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Help Prevent Dental Emergencies

We tend to neglect the dental aspects of emergency preparedness. True dental health comes from within your body and teeth via your nutrition levels and enamel hardness comes from the nutrients in your diet.

It’s no surprise that the more vitamins and minerals that your body is able to absorb, the healthier you will stay. Maintaining a proper diet that is rich in high protein meats, grains and a combination of fruits and vegetables benifits your overall health.

If a long-term emergency were to occur where your daily vitamin intake suddenly decreases, or you fail to properly care for your teeth because of lack of dental supplies, then your overall health, as well as your teeth may suffer and degrade. As a result, teeth could abscess and cause bacterial infections that can cause serious health conditions. Many preparedness-centered individuals are trying to curb this type of emergency by storing vitamins. Taking vitamins during a long-term emergency will assist in regulating body functions, continued mental alertness, assist in maintaining good eye sight, as well as keep teeth and gums healthy.  However, they will do you no good if you do not take them regularly. Some vitamins and minerals to consider for long-term preparedness are:

General Multivitamin: This basic multivitamin will provide your body is its basic daily vitamin and minerals. Buying the multivitamin for mature adults will give a person increased levels of certain needed minerals that may further improve health.

Vitamin A: Vitamin A is responsible for maintaining healthy gums. Without it, gum infections do not heal as fast and calculus tends to form more quickly under the gums. Lack of vitamin A is also associated with abnormal bone and tooth formation.

B Complex Vitamins: These are also a big player in fighting gum disease. B vitamin deficiencies can make gingivitis more severe and cause sores in the gums, tongue and other soft tissues in the mouth.

Vitamin C: Without it your gums become more vulnerable to infection, bleeding, and gum disease. A vitamin C deficiency makes whatever gum issues problem you have much worse. If you have periodontal disease, a lack of vitamin C increases bleeding and swelling and accelerates destructive effects. Studies have revealed that people who consume less of Vitamin C tend to be 25% more likely to suffer from gum disease.

Vitamin D: This vitamin not only strengthens your immunity against disease, but it also absorbs calcium that is needed for healthy teeth and also assists in keeping the teeth anchored into their sockets. Vitamin D has been shown to reduce gingivitis because of the anti- inflammatory effects of the vitamin.

Calcium: 99% of the calcium in your body is in your bones and your teeth. Dietary calcium is needed to make sure they’re in good shape. It is important to understand that the calcium that is present in bones and teeth is constantly in a state of movement. The calcium gets reabsorbed into the bloodstream if levels are low, and it is put back into bones and teeth when levels are higher. This is why Vitamin D is so important because it regulates this entire mechanism. People with low intake of Calcium and vitamin C are more likely to suffer from periodontal disease. Children’s teeth need Calcium to develop properly.

Phosphorus: Calcium alone cannot take all the credit for proper teeth formation. In fact, about 85% of phosphorus in the body can be found in bones and teeth. It has been found that vitamin D compliments this mineral by boosting its effectiveness.

Storing Vitamins

Vitamins tend to expire after a year.  However, there has been contradicting information regarding taking medicines and vitamins after the expiration dates have passed. Since the expiration date is probably conservative to ensure full potency, and aimed at the manufacturer and store more than the consumer, taking vitamins passed their expiration date will not put a person in danger. However, the potency of the vitamin may come into question if a person takes it passed their expiration date.

Keeping vitamins in a cool, dark area of the home will ensure they their potency for as long as possible.  Over time, vitamins will gradually oxidize, and become less effective.  It happens faster if the environment you keep them in is humid (e.g. your kitchen or your bathroom).

In Summary

 Health experts are coming to the conclusion that there is a correlation between vitamins and dental health.  Stocking up on vitamins to enhance your overall health and assist in maintaining teeth and preventing dental-related diseases would be a proactive way to prepare for a long-term emergency.

Via: readynutrition


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