Tag Archive: Vehicle

Free Homesteading, Cooking, Prepper, Survival eBooks & PDF’s for 08-27-18

Free Kindle Survival Homesteading Books

Free Homesteading, cooking, Survival, , and Prepping Kindle ebooks and PDF’s? Yes FREE Kindle ebooks and PDF’s!! Every now and then Amazon runs special offers on some of their Kindle ebooks and PDF’s, making them free for a limited time (usually just 24 hours).

I will check Amazon on regularly basis for their free Kindle ebooks in related subjects such as survival, homesteading and prepping etc. I will do all the leg-work for you so you don’t have to. You can just come back here regularly, so make sure to bookmark this blog.

These ebooks and PDF’s are only free for a limited time so if you are interested in one make sure you get it right away so you don’t lose out!

Remember you DON’T need a kindle to take advantage of these! There are FREE kindle apps for most major platforms!! iPhone, iPad, PC, Mac and Android. You can find those apps here!

Always check price before engaging, to make sure it hasn’t returned to full price.

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Start now to make sure you are staying prepared.


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Free Homesteading, Cooking, Prepper, Survival eBooks & PDF’s for 08-11-18

Free Kindle Survival Homesteading Books

Free Homesteading, cooking, Survival, , and Prepping Kindle ebooks and PDF’s? Yes FREE Kindle ebooks and PDF’s!! Every now and then Amazon runs special offers on some of their Kindle ebooks and PDF’s, making them free for a limited time (usually just 24 hours).

I will check Amazon on regularly basis for their free Kindle ebooks in related subjects such as survival, homesteading and prepping etc. I will do all the leg-work for you so you don’t have to. You can just come back here regularly, so make sure to bookmark this blog.

These ebooks and PDF’s are only free for a limited time so if you are interested in one make sure you get it right away so you don’t lose out!

Remember you DON’T need a kindle to take advantage of these! There are FREE kindle apps for most major platforms!! iPhone, iPad, PC, Mac and Android. You can find those apps here!

Always check price before engaging, to make sure it hasn’t returned to full price.

imageimageimage

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imageimageimage

 

 

Start now to make sure you are staying prepared.


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Free Homesteading, Cooking, Prepper, Survival eBooks & PDF’s for 07-25-18

Free Kindle Survival Homesteading Books

Free Homesteading, cooking, Survival, , and Prepping Kindle ebooks and PDF’s? Yes FREE Kindle ebooks and PDF’s!! Every now and then Amazon runs special offers on some of their Kindle ebooks and PDF’s, making them free for a limited time (usually just 24 hours).

I will check Amazon on regularly basis for their free Kindle ebooks in related subjects such as survival, homesteading and prepping etc. I will do all the leg-work for you so you don’t have to. You can just come back here regularly, so make sure to bookmark this blog.

These ebooks and PDF’s are only free for a limited time so if you are interested in one make sure you get it right away so you don’t lose out!

Remember you DON’T need a kindle to take advantage of these! There are FREE kindle apps for most major platforms!! iPhone, iPad, PC, Mac and Android. You can find those apps here!

Always check price before engaging, to make sure it hasn’t returned to full price.

imageimageimage

imageimageimage

imageimageimage

imageimageimage

 

 

 

Start now to make sure you are staying prepared.


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Bugout Trailers that will Go Anywhere: 5 OFFGRID Trailers

Over the next couple of months, we are going to be looking at a number of different options for building your own bug out trailer, but to get things started I wanted to share how we got some of our inspiration.


Off The Grid Trailers: The Ultimate Portable Bug Out Shelters

We are starting a series on building the perfect bugout vehicle. During our research, I came across a number of commercial off-road solutions that I really liked. They range from barebones trailers to luxury traveling bunkers; while some are a bit excessive, and on the expensive side, they did help us come up with plans for our own bugout trailer.

These little trailers can help beef up your bugout plans; not only do they allow you to carry extra gear, but in a pinch they can be used as makeshift bugout shelters. They are tough, reliable, and can be hauled anywhere your tow vehicle can go.

BushRanger 200 XT Off Road Trailer


The BushRanger 200 XT Off Road Trailer by Kakadu Camping is a 4′ x 7′ steel box trailer with an independent axle-less suspension system that gives you a softer ride even while driving off -road. It gives you approximately 200 square feet of living space including the main bed, tent, and awning. The BushRanger 200 XT retails for $8,995.


You can find out more about the BushRanger at kakaducamping.com

The HEO T3 Trailer


At a base weight of only 550lbs, the HEO T3 can be pulled by almost any vehicle. The trailer is constructed with Mig Welded 6063-T6 tubular aluminum and covered with covered with ACM, aluminum composite material. That means not only is this trailer light, it’s also guaranteed not to rot or rust.


The trailer sleeps up to 3 people and the base model retails for $7,495. More info can be found on the HEO website.

Commander Travel Trailers by Conqueror Campers


While you can’t get these outside of Australia, if you plan on building your own off the grid trailer the Commander Travel Trailer is a good place to start.


This thing is awesome! The Commander features slideout sections for the bathroom, kitchen, storage, and water.


The sleeping are is inside the trailer, and several tent configurations can be set up to depending on what you are looking to do. You can check out more of their trailers at conqueroraustralia.com.au

The Jayco Jay Sport Baja Edition


If you are looking for something that looks a little bit more traditional or something that can fit up to 8 people, the Jay Sport Baja Edition is the way to go. The Baja comes equipped with 15-inch mud tires and an extra 5 inches of ground clearance.


When fully popped up some of these units are over 25 feet in length, but when collapsed they can fit in almost any garage. Fully loaded with all the options the trailers $12,107. You can check them out at jayco.com

Base Camp Trailers


Base Camp Trailers, built by Mobilight International In Salt Lake City Utah, are built with preppers in mind. They are fabricated with a steel tube frame and 16ga sheet steel body and they come with a ton of add-on options for preppers.


Add-on options include built-in rooftop gun boxes, solar panels packages, and fresh water storage tanks. The base models start at $4,950. You can find out more info at thebasecamptrailer.com

Start now to make sure you are staying prepared.

Via: offgridsurvival


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The Best Driveway Alarm With No False Alarms


If you are wondering what is the best driveway alarm (always subjective and dependent upon your requirements), let me offer my years of experience having installed and used all sorts of different wireless devices for my own home security – devices (e.g motion sensors / alarms) that are designed to alert you inside your home that a vehicle is approaching and/or coming down your driveway or private road…

I have finally installed what I believe is the best driveway alarm (that I currently am aware of), at least one that will not require lots of money or a professional installer – and it actually works for its intended purpose – to alert you that a vehicle is approaching.

The key word is ‘vehicle’, because this driveway alarm does not (thankfully) issue false alarms for animals, blowing tree branches, or any old thing that ‘moves’ in front of it, etc… I just want to be alerted for vehicles for this particular purpose.

The product that I’m talking about is:

Mighty Mule Wireless Driveway Alarm (FM231)



The ‘Mighty Mule’ company (no affiliation with this blog) designs devices for automatic gate openers. They also design a driveway alarm using their same sensor technology.


No False Alarms
The reason that their driveway alarm does not issue false alarms for non-vehicles (e.g. animals that happen to pass by or the wind blowing tree branches or bushes, etc…) is because they do not use the type of sensor that throws ‘a beam’ that simply gets interrupted or one that senses a thermal heat signature (infrared) when something passes in front of it.


Sensor Detects Surrounding Magnetic Field
Instead, the Mighty Mule utilizes a sensor ‘wand’ that is specially designed to ‘sense’ its surrounding magnetic field and any disturbances to that magnetic field. The sensor wand is designed to be buried out of sight – several inches deep, up to 12 inches deep – alongside the roadway or driveway, and is connected (via a weatherproof cable) to a transmitter device (also weather proof).



Driveway Alarm Transmitter
The transmitter utilizes two ‘AA’ batteries (use Lithium batteries for best performance) to send its signal to the receiver which is located inside the home.


How It Works
When a vehicle passes by within 15 feet of the electromagnetic sensor, the disturbance in the magnetic field (via the metal of the vehicle) triggers the transmitter to send an alert / alarm back to the receiver.


Driveway Alarm Indoor Receiver
An alarm sounds from the indoor receiver which has an adjustable volume control – letting you know that a vehicle has passed by the sensor.

There is also a low-battery indicator on the indoor receiver which lets you know when the transmitter batteries need to be replaced (a nice feature).

The receiver also has an LED that lets you know that the device has been triggered (in case you missed the audible alarm due to being somewhere else), and it will remain lit until you press a ‘reset’ button. This is another nice feature letting you know that a vehicle has passed by the sensor when you were away.


Great Security For Private Driveway Or Private Road
I happen to live at the end of a private road. It’s nice to know when a vehicle is coming down the road. Having this driveway alarm is especially comforting for ‘the middle of the night’ when there certainly should be no vehicle approaching. If the alarm is ever triggered in the wee hours of the morning, it will ‘buy time’ to get prepared for whatever may be heading this way…


Driveway Alarm Distance
The ‘Mighty Mule’ specification indicates that the driveway alarm will transmit up to 400 feet (ideal conditions). My own installation is at a distance of 330 feet including a number of trees in the way, and it works solid from there. I tried further, but the road dips down and becomes out of ‘the line of sight’ with the receiver (and there are lots more trees in the way) at the 400 foot mark. When I tested the distances (do this before digging the trench!) the 400 foot distance was marginal so I brought it in closer to be assured of a consistent signal.


Mighty Mule Installation Tips
When you insert the ‘AA’ batteries into the transmitter, it ‘takes a snapshot’ of the surrounding magnetic field via the sensor wand’s current position. It uses this reference ‘snapshot’ to detect subsequent differences in the magnetic field which will trigger the alarm. So, when inserting the batteries for testing (and when inserting the batteries for the last time after you’ve completed the installation) be sure that the environment within a 15 foot radius does not include ‘non-typical’ metal objects. For example, a shovel setting nearby, etc…).

Orient the sensor wand parallel with (in line with) the driveway.

Try to get best ‘line of sight’ between the transmitter location and the receiver. The more trees, buildings, walls, the less effective distance. For example, my receiver is setting on the bedroom window sill which faces the general direction of the transmitter.

Once I had determined the location for the transmitter and after I dug the trench for the wand, cable, and support post, I set the plastic support post (of the transmitter) in a shallow dug hole filled with a puddle of concrete for longevity and support, then threw some dirt on top for the grass to grow.

Paint the support post and the transmitter cover to match your surroundings. I used a ‘forest green’ spray paint.


CONCLUSION
An important aspect of overall preparedness is security. Depending on where you live and the layout of your property, this driveway alarm might be something that helps with yours.

Start now to make sure you are staying prepared.

Via: modernsurvivalblog


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Tips You Must Remember to Protect Your Vehicle from an EMP

If the US federal government says something is a threat — or if they happen to admit that something’s a threat — then it’s likely much more of a pending alarming situation than the government cares to admit.

Keeping that in mind, the federal government — which include multiple agencies and the military — have relinquished that one huge threat to our very lives is an Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP).

Whether it takes place by intent (a nuclear detonation or terrorism) or by chance (EMP destruction caused by a meteorite or comet), an EMP event would no doubt be life altering.

If an event like this were to take place, one major challenge would be transportation. The majority of today’s vehicles are reliant on computers and electrical components which translates to if an EMP took place, a vehicle would become hunks of metal, rubber, and plastic.

Some estimates put the aftermath of an EMP to be weeks, some months and a few, more dire predictions put the recovery time at years.

That means you have to do what you can to ensure your vehicle(s) are as EMP proof as possible; here are some tips when choosing a vehicle and some ways you can further EMP-protect your vehicles.

First, there are factors to consider in choosing a post-EMP bug-out or survival vehicle:

1. Benefits of Diesel

A large and strong enough EMP could stop the extraction, refinement, distribution and sale of fossil fuels. Whatever gas you have on hand could be all the gas you get for years. The more highly a fuel is refined, the shorter its storage life. Diesel is less refined than unleaded so diesel stores longer.

You make biodiesel from crops that you grow. Diesel motors are somewhat simpler than gasoline motors in that they do not have an ignition system. This cuts down on some vulnerable parts.
Most tractors also run on diesel too, so for many homesteaders, it is worth considering.

2. Fuel Capacity

You can add oversized and/or additional fuel tanks to many vehicles, increasing the vehicle’s range. A post EMP world will likely have far fewer gas stations, if any. To get at any of remaining fuel, you will need a pump and hose like the Jackrabbit by Black & Decker.

Even though you’d like to bug out in your shelter or bug out cabin in the woods that may not be a possibility. It’s always a good idea to have a backup plan and one such backup is making sure your vehicle also has a cargo space, roof rack, or a swing out to create more space. In addition to that, a vehicle that has off-road capability will be essential to driving where you need to go no matter the weather or road.

3. Cargo or Towing Capability

By the time you pile in what will surely be everything you own in this world, your spouse, your 2.4 kids, grandma and the golden retriever, you may be looking for ways to increase your vehicle’s carrying capacity. So cargo space, a trailer hitch, roof rack, swing outs and so forth will come in handy. For many, the vehicle will likely double as their home.

4. Off-Road Capability

Features such as 4-wheel drive, a full size spare, plenty of ground clearance, all-terrain tires, lockers, extraction or trail gear, towing points, winch and off road lighting will come in handy post-EMP because roads will no longer be maintained, disabled vehicles and vehicles that have run out of fuel will litter the roadway. Imagine the highway or even your own street after a snowstorm without any snowplows or drivers to remove the snow and 4-wheel drive and over-size tires starts to look like a pretty good idea

Sure a souped up car may seem cool right now, but when SHTF it’s going to be the last thing you need. A vehicle that’s easy to repair and that also consists of parts that you could easily find or get if you needed to is recommended. It’ll make life so much easier for you during an EMP.

5. Ease of Maintenance & Repair

Simplicity is a good thing when it comes to survival. Without computers, there is only so much to “do it yourself” on newer vehicles so older vehicles have greater appeal. A good repair manual and well-equipped toolbox are mission-critical equipment.

6. Commonality of Parts

An expensive custom vehicle might look cool online or be fun to daydream about, but after a HEMP, the first time it needs a part, you might wish you bought something a little more pedestrian (no pun intended). Better still would be 2 or 3 less-expensive vehicles as opposed to a single vehicle that strains your financial resources.

My grandfather did this and I learned it from him. He would take multiple beat-up vehicles and turn them into fewer good ones … and have a bunch of spare parts left over. A bunch of spare parts would be a good thing post-EMP.

Again, newer vehicles have 100’s of processors that make everything about a car complicated and intricate. Avoid getting a vehicle with the systems listed below, as it will be very difficult to find replacement parts for them. Furthermore, keep reading to learn the best way to blend in and not stand out during an EMP — your lives depend on it!

7. Fewest Possible Microelectronics, Computers or Chips

Some newer vehicles have in excess of 100 processors that run on miniscule amounts of power. They sense and control virtually every function of the vehicle and are very sensitive to EMP.

How far are you going to get without an engine, fuel injection, transmission or 4-wheel drive system? Sure, car manufacturers take reasonable precautions to shield them, but not against such great field strengths or over the entire frequency range EMP covers. Any transistor-based technology is vulnerable.

Avoid vehicles with the following systems, rewire them or replace them with their non-electronic counterparts and/or stock replacements in a Faraday cage:

•    PCM (Powertrain Control Module)
•    Anti-lock Braking System
•    Electronic Fuel Injection
•    Electronic Ignition
•    Computers Controlling Critical Systems
•    Consumer Electronics
•    Long Antennas
•    Negative Battery Terminal Grounded to Vehicle Frame

8. Overt vs Covert

It is often best to blend in as opposed to standing out. In the city, that might mean driving a white sedan or van. In the bush, it might mean a camouflage or matte earth tone paint job.
Other times, looking like you are not worth tangling with might be the better option.

A durable metal body is crucial for your SHTF vehicle, as is EMP-hardening your auto. Rebuilding your vehicle may be necessary especially if you don’t have the funds to buy another vehicle. However, by investing your time to make sure your auto has the correct features for when an EMP arrives, you’ll be glad you took the time to make sure everything was setup correctly.

9. Conductive Metal Body

For the best EMP-resistance, choose a vehicle with conductive metal body enclosing the engine and passenger compartment or cab over a vehicle with body panels made of fiberglass, plastic or any other non-conductive material.

How to EMP-Harden Your Auto

If your vehicle already has these features or you are already doing these things, then you are already part of the way there. There are many features to look for and modifications to make to both your vehicle and your SOP (Standard Operating Procedure) regarding that vehicle.
No matter which automobile you choose, there is always more that can be done to minimize the effect of HEMP on the vehicle.

•    Ground all conductive components of the vehicle to a single point on the chassis. Do not ground them to the earth.

•    Rewire with shielded wiring: Verify that your wiring is shielded or replace all you can with shielded wiring.

•    Re-bond metal body panels: Remove body panels and make sure that you have good conductive bonds between body panels by removing paint and installing conductive gasket material or make sure you have metal on metal contact with as much overlap as possible. This will help the body conduct energy through the vehicle skin like the skin of a Faraday cage. Just do not allow yourself to be fooled into thinking that the vehicle skin is without holes that compromise its integrity.

•    Route wiring close to the vehicle frame

•    Install ferrite clamps or snap on cores on cable ends

•    Protect cable entry and exit points with surge suppression: This will need to be fast-clamping surge protection faster than one millisecond that will handle high voltages. (Think lightening protection.)

•    Mechanical ignition (points and condenser)

•    Install EMP-rated surge protection on antennas

•    Mechanical fuel & water pumps

•    Carburetor or mechanical fuel injection

•    Keep spares of vulnerable parts you cannot replace in a Faraday cage: You may have a vehicle that is mostly good to go, but it still parts like a starter, alternator and voltage regulator that do not contain microelectronics, but could still conceivably be affected.

•    Manual transmission: Some will surely disagree with me on this one, but they are easier to repair and make it possible to push start vehicles even if the battery is shot or missing. Even some diesels can be push or roll started if you wire open the fuel valve.

An EMP seems like a remote threat until you realize how many “rogue” nations have nuclear weapons or are desperately trying to get them. Add into that mix terrorists who are determined to alter our way of life and the threat becomes more real.

So real the US federal government has indicated they are worried and if they admit that, we all should be very worried

To learn more about vehicles that will stand up better against an EMP, please visit Survivorpedia.

Start now to make sure you are staying prepared.

Via: diehardsurvivor


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Navigation During a Disaster

Emergencies don’t happen only during convenient times.  What if something happens and we are at work, school or some other location?  Our family has discussions about what we would do if an event were to happen and we are nowhere near each other.  We have to make sure we know how to get back together no matter where we are.

Most people rely on their cars’ GPS device or mapping app on their smart phones.  But a disaster may cause disruptions to connectivity.  If you are in an unfamiliar location when an emergency happens, you need a backup method to find alternate ways back home.

Those maps include:  local area map, topographical map and extended area map.   You can get local area maps and state maps for free from a roadside travel service such as AAA.  I was able to get local area maps and a state map for free.  Check with your auto insurance company if they have these maps may be available for free.

You can find free topographical maps at http://www.anyplaceamerica.com/ A variety of maps can also be found at http://www.usgs.gov/pubprod/

Familiarize yourself with using paper maps.  Teach your children how to use paper maps as well.  One of the things my Dad taught me after I learned how to drive was how to use a Thomas Guide.

If you currently do not have any paper maps, print alternate routes to your destinations using MapQuest or Google Maps.

When traveling to new areas, pay attention to your surroundings:  make a mental note of natural features such as rivers, hills, mountains etc.  Also note the towns you are passing by, gas stations, rest areas, the characteristics of the road such as turns, slopes etc.  Don’t “zone out;” instead, observe your surroundings so you find a route back if you had to.

Of course, these are all in addition to having a car survival kit at all times.

 

Start now to make sure you are staying prepared.

 

Via: apartmentprepper


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Using a Boat as a Bug Out Location

 

 

I’ll let out a little secret here – I’m working on a new book about boats and survival. There are a couple of reasons for this new endeavor, not the least of which is that at one point in my life I was drawn to the ocean like a moth to light. We used to have a very nice power boat and practically every weekend was spent aboard. We voyaged all over the gulf coast, and some of my fondest memories were aboard our cruiser. Work, children and life changed that but one day I may retire on the water.

As a matter of fact, our boat was our bug out location for years. In reality, it wasn’t the perfect vessel for that purpose as it was a gasoline hog and wasn’t designed for extended voyages without re-supply. Boats are like cars, rifles and pizza – they are a compromise. Since we were weekenders, we wanted to get from point A to point B reasonably quickly and that translates into high fuel consumption in the nautical world. It doesn’t have to be that way as there are many designs out there that enjoy pretty good miles per gallon. These vessels are just slower than their gas guzzling brethren.  Probably the best is the original hybrid – a sail boat.


Some people will immediately dismiss the idea of using a boat as a BOL. In researching the concept for the new book, I went to all of the popular blogs and forums reading everything I could find. That didn’t take long as there isn’t a lot out there. At first, that was good news because I like writing about things no one else has. Originality is a good thing. What little I did find on the web basically dismissed the idea of a floating BOL due to practicality.

Now I can list a dozen reasons why a boat isn’t the best choice for a BOL, but practicality isn’t one of them. I asked myself “what am I missing here?”

Like so many things in the blogosphere, people spout off about topics they really don’t know anything about. You could take the word “blogosphere” and substitute it with “Cable News” or “the water cooler at the office” and that statement would still be true, but for us Preppers, the internet is one of our primary resources. When someone lays out a line of crap on the net, many of us Preppers nod our heads and take the information to heart.

I believe most people initially think boats are only for the ultra-wealthy. That’s not entirely accurate. You can purchase a reasonable condition, used sail boat for about the same price as a trailer camper these days. I see ads for hundreds of 25-35 foot vessels for less than $50,000. There are numerous tax advantages for a boat and many banks offer financing similar to a home mortage.

Now, low end used boats are known to be a money pit. Boats are similar to campers in that stuff breaks on them all the time. But for a BOL, they don’t have to be fully functional and ready for a transatlantic voyage. When you compare a boat to a piece of country property, complete with shelter, water and food supply – a boat starts looking like a bargain from a financial perspective.

Many boats are designed to be self-sufficient for long periods of time. This statement should cause the average Prepper’s head to snap up and pay attention. Many have water makers so you have virtually unlimited supply of fresh water. They have sewage systems, redundant power systems and huge fuel storage capacities. All of these items are normally high on anyone’s list of preps. A 35 foot, used sail boat I recently looked at was designed for four adults to enjoy extended stays onboard. It was $29,000. It had solar power, a generator, 12 volt to 115 AC inverter, full kitchen, two showers, microwave, two televisions, radar, GPS, VHF radio, dual voltage frig, dual voltage freezer, and ice maker, and a water maker. Its little diesel motor could move it along at about 10 miles per gallon without using the sails at all. Its 80 gallon fuel tank could run the generator for a long time.

If you want to discuss food supplies, it would be difficult to debate anything being better than a boat – even on fresh water. One could live off of fishing, kelp, oysters, shrimp and costal plants for a long time. Throw in a well thought out “deck garden” and you have a practically infinite food supply.

Energy, or specifically electrical energy, is a mixed bag on a boat. Many sailing vessels have wind turbines and solar systems of limited power. Huge banks of batteries are not uncommon. Some modern vessels even have electric drives. Almost every vessel over 28 feet has a generator. It would not be extremely difficult to set up a boat to be off-the-grid independent if it already isn’t.

From a security perspective, a boat would get mixed reviews. As all of my books denote, people are going to be the biggest problem if it all falls apart. It would be difficult to imagine being able to isolate one’s self more so than on a boat. The only security exposure from being water bound would be the difficulty in hiding. Depending on your geographic location, that may or may not be a problem. Along our Texas coast, I know dozens of private little coves where I have dropped the hook and spent the long weekend fishing. Again, all things are a compromise.

To summarize, a boat makes sense for a BOL in all of the major categories we prep for. Food, shelter, energy, water and security are all equal to or perhaps better than their landlocked alternatives. What strikes me as the biggest positive is the dual usage. Boating is fun for the family. Even if it never leaves the marina, being on or around the water can be a recreational highlight. If it never falls apart – if TEOTWAWKI never happens, boating preppers still would have invested in something worthwhile.

BTW, there is also a forum thread on bug out boats on Zombie Squad.

 

Some nice Comments:

One of the biggest thing you missed about boat as a BOL is the fact that if things get bad where you’re at, all you have to do is pull anchor and make a run for it with all of your preps, gear and your home. The last time I checked you can relocate your BOL in the mountains.
I’ve been around boats all my life, and I’m like and don’t get the problem with boats as a BOL.


Dmitry Orlov of “Reinventing Collapse” (the book) fame and Club Orlov blog lives on a boat specifically for survival. He’s written about it on his blog many times.

—-

Many of us also remember reading the stories of ‘River Rats’ and persons who lived in houseboats during the Great Depression, I’m sure the memories dimmed the bad points, but the good points sounded – good! If you born ‘In The Bayou’, I’ll bet good times would be easy to find.

 

——

As noted above, Orlov has written some on the sailboat as BOV.

http://cluborlov.blogspot.com/2011/06/sailing-craft-for-post-collapse-world.html

The one novel I can think of that heavily features sailing as a BOV is Luke Rhinehart’s Long Voyage back.

http://reflexionesfinales.blogspot.com/2011/07/long-voyage-back-review.html

You could intermix it with Alex Scarrow’s Afterlight which features an off shore oil rig to come up with some interesting scenarios/ideas: particularly of the Gulf Coast.

http://reflexionesfinales.blogspot.com/2011/09/afterlight-review.html

My biggest problem with Orlov, is that he views the sailboat as a free pass. In a severe collapse situation, those with access to waters will use that mobility, and it is fairly sure that some of those people will not be nice. The people of Dark Age Greece, and the Chaotic Medieval Baltic Coasts kept their villages safe from direct approach by water. Even if they were close to the water, they were up some high rocky promenade, or you had to wind your way through tricky swamps to get to village: they were not your fishing or trade friendly locations.

—-

 

Start now to make sure you are staying prepared.

 

Via:  shtfblog


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Map Of EVERY Road In The United States… All On The Same Map


This incredible map which shows every single road within the United States (on the same map) also reveals ‘where we are’, as in population density and our ‘footprint’ across the nation.

Having been sent a reference to this unique road map (hat-tip to one of our readers), and since I enjoy ‘map’s, and for your interest – the full resolution map is much more interesting…

Many preparedness-minded people are motivated by the systemic risks which come with population density. While ‘it takes a village’ for a successful community, it takes a lot more than that to sustain a population density which needs to import much or all of its supplies to survive.

With that in mind, the following road map (which actually looks surprisingly similar to a population density map) indicates our lines of travel.


Map Of ALL Roads In The United States
After opening the map, you can click and scroll for full resolution.
13500×9000 pixels (10.4 MB)

The map has been making its way around the web, and is in the public domain. According to The Washington Post, the road map originated from a Reddit user, WestCoastBestCoast94, who apparently created it.

Note: If you’re looking for a ‘navigational’ road map for your State, you will find some of the best choices in the following article,
Maps For Your Car: State Maps and Road Atlas


The following State maps are higher resolution of the United States map listed above. You might find it interesting to look at your own State to see the ‘density’ of roads.

Index Of Roads

 

Start now to make sure you are staying prepared.

 

 

Via: modernsurvivalblog


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Bug out bags and vehicles

When plans have gone to hell, when your commandeered short bus is going up in flames…that’s when you need a bug out bag.


As popular as bug out bags are, their role in survival/preparedness plans is often misunderstood.

You’ll often hear stuff like “Man, bugging out is crazy! I’m going to bug in and stay home!” or “Why would I choose to be a refugee with nothing but a backpack on my back?”

And then on the other hand, you’ll have others who for some reason plan to start marching off into the woods with a giant pack to pitch a tent, hang out and start bush crafting.

It’s all too common, and unfortunately both are completely missing the point.

I agree – bugging out shouldn’t be your primary plan. Or even your secondary. Yep, you’ll want to bug in…at least as long as it is safe to do so.

If you’re forced to leave your bug in location and retreat to safety, you’ll want to load up your truck/SUV with every possible thing that you can for that journey. Gear, food, water, fuel…heck, hook up that bug out trailer, too.

There are of course various things that can go wrong or draw you away from your vehicle. Crash, break downs, getting stuck, running out of fuel, getting hopelessly stuck in traffic, floods, impassable roads, attacks on your vehicle…or, even just heading out on foot for a scout/patrol of an area.

That’s when you want your bug out bag.

In the Walking Dead screen grab from above, they crashed their short bus and it burst into flames. Crap – there goes their transportation as well as the majority of food and weaponry they appeared to have brought along for their journey.

In You Took Away Tomorrow, the characters first attempt to bug in at Jack Rourke’s home. Then, when their home is compromised, they try to bug out via their vehicles. When the group’s makeshift convoy falls under attack from machine gun wielding neo nazi bikers, they resort to a bug out on foot.

Soldiers and especially contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan have been well known to carry ‘go bags’ in their armored SUVs – small bags that they can grab during an attack. They pack them with spare mags, medical gear, radios, smoke grenades and other assorted cool guy stuff to help them get back to safety or hold out until rescue arrives.

An example of a ‘worst case’ for this in action. This was shared by a recent Haley Strategic class participant – think instead of just grabbing long guns, they’d be throwing on bug out bags as well.

Post by Ryan Smith.

In my opinion, a bug out bag should work in this kind of environment and scenario. You should be able to move quickly, even move and shoot while wearing it. It should also be of a size ‘works’ around a vehicle and can be retrieved and donned quickly if needed…not some giant hiking pack that you can barely lift.

If you had gunfire (or quickly rising flood waters, or fire, or whatever) coming in your direction, how long would you spend screwing around with a pack? Be able to grab and move – that’s the point.

 

 

Start now to make sure you are staying prepared.

 

 

 

Via :   teotwawki-blog


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